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in that environment, it has been hard to convince others of the need to sustain necessary levels of funding for diplomacy. what we really have is a government with one institution or a collection of institutions that are basically on steroids. the rest of our government, which is essentially on life- support. that is hard to sustain. one of the things i like about the state department is that you need to get back -- get by on cunning and strategy. you do not have the resources the other branches of the government has. the hope that there will be balanced in the account period ahead, the new budget includes the state department as part of the national security as a whole. i would not hold my breath. i think it will be hard making the case robusta diplomacy. my hope is that it will be a bipartisan effort. it will be challenged not matter much. my primary -- it will be challenged no matter what. we need something that will allow our forces to do several things. first, we need a robust change of views on strategy and our overall approach is. the kind of thing that chris laid out on talking abou
environment you are going into which is the culture, which is the underlying framework of economic, social, sociallily what's going on within a country. we have to do a better job of understanding. that we've learned that lesson. we're incorporating that better. we have to be able to be adaptive and agile as we adjust the type of techniques and the capabilities we have when we get into an operation. >> more with general ray odierno, army chief of staff, in just a moment. you're watching "this week in defense news." >>> we're back with army chief of staff general ray odierno. sir, one of your priority efforts is to redesign the brigade combat teams. why is that so necessary, and what are we going to see come out of that process? >> well what we've learned is, in terms of brigade combat team, we need it to be agile and flexible enough to operate across a broad spectrum of missions. we've done a significant amount of analysis both technical analysis, tactical analysis, to come up with a new design. so the one thing that's absolutely essential is we must have a third ma niewfer battalion -- a
think the future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons, but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward? so we have to update several things. we just rolled out brand new doctrine. the first time the army has done an extensive doctrine in recent memory. and we have published the initial high level documents of our doctrine, we'll start to publish the subelements of this over the next six, eight months. it represents some of the lesson we learn and how we think it a-- it will apply to the future. this is key as we start to look to the future making sure we are based in what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing doctrine. we have to look at operations, type of operations. what are the best way to train our forces for the future? one of the more important thing is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development programs. what i mean by this, about adapting leader development programs from the
to be resources going forward. secretary clinton had an absolute heavyweight, but even in that environment it's hard to convince others that they need to sustain the necessary levels of funding for diplomacy. what we really have is a government with one institution or collection of institutions basically on steroids, military and national security and the rest of our government, essentially in my support. that is a very hard team to sustain. one of the things i like about the state department, but one of the things that the challenge as he got to get by and cunning and guile and strategy. if you don't have the programs come you don't have the resources at their riches of the government have. the hope is there's going to be more balance in the period ahead. the new budgeting apparatus includes the state department as part of the national security budget as a whole. but i wouldn't hold my breath. you think it's going to be hard and making the case for robust diplomacy, my hope would be a bipartisan affair, but it's going to be a challenge to matter what. secondly unmelted now,, my primary inter
we think of future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward. so we have to do several things. we just rolled out brand-new documents for the first time the army has done an extensive rollout of doctrine and recent memory. we published the initial high-level documents of our doctrine and the sub elements over the next six or eight months and represent represents represent some of the lessons we learned in how we think they will apply in the future. this is key as we start to look to the future, making sure we are dazed and what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing a doctrine. we have to look at operations in the type of operations and what are the best ways train our forces for the future. one of the more important things is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development program so what i mean by this, this is about adapting leaders from the time
they apply to what we think the future operating environment with the. so with learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward. so we have to update several things. we just rolled out a brand-new doctrine. the first time the army has been an extensive rollout of doctrine in recent memory. we have published the additional high level documents of our doctrine. we will start to publish the sub elements of this over the next six or eight months and represent some the lessons we've learned how we figure we'll apply to the future. and this is key as we start to look for the future as making sure we are based in what we believe is a way forward and we do that by riding doctrine. we have to look at operations, the type of operations, what are the best way to train our forces for the future, what are more important thing is how do we develop leaders. we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt a related development programs. what i mean by this, this is about adapting programs
environment in iraq and assure more japanese firms can do business in the country. the president met iraq's prime minister through his first visit to the country and told the minister japanese companies are concerned about the risks of doing business in iraq. they include the sudden cancellation of contract. he asked iraq to promote a more business friendly environment. he stressed that the company will help iraq draft a legal framework to protect the rights of investors. next year will mark the tenth anniversary of the start of the iraq war. violence still rocks the country but iraq is becoming a major oil producer once again. the country's economic growth is expected to top 12% this year. japan self defense forces and u.s. military will hold their training exercise in waters off okinawa prefecture. they were to practice a land mag nufr, but it has forced military plan tires take a less direct approach. the drill is part of a large scale exercise that starts next week. commanders want to enhance the defense of southwestern islands. in italy they plan to hold a drill on an uninhabited isl
, shape the environment after you get out? and i think that's what all of this talk about 2014 in afghanistan is, to focus the minds of afghan leaders. we are not going to be around. and i actually think iraq has gone better than i expected. so, who knows. afghanistan might too. i'm actually though in the long run, more pessimistic about afghanistan than i am about iraq. >> start by why do you think iraq has gone better than expected and then michael will talk about where you think there's gaps in this path's approach to t. >> i thought that iraq would unravel after the americans left. in fact, aid series on my blog called "iraq, the unraveling." it hasn't. rather it has sort of come to a stalemate it is not falling apart but not making any political progress it is just sort of sitting there, not a great situation but actually better than i personally expected when i last took a long look at iraq. what people forget in this country though is iraq, even right now, is still more violent than afghanistan is. >> well, i actually think the search was considerable success in a milita
health and if you are chronically suffering from challenges in the environment or from wherever source, you are going to be not paying a lot of attention to things that are very far away, but how do ye exist, how do i deal with this problem, how do my children and my family deal with these issues and as you are well aware, there are still lots of problems in the world. the good news is there's been a tremendous amount of progress, scientific knowledge that many of you in this room have been major contributors to that. and we have made great strides, and it seems to me that one of the things that ought to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage the advances in science and medicine directly benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, salt, resolved or ameliorated by these advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us. and why i am interested in being here, why i am participating in this and why there is still a lot of work to be done. now that you are all here no one signs the room without signing a pledge to donate a significant amo
approval rating -- of an approval rating in this environment getting thrown out, getting rejected. caller: he covers politics for the "philadelphia inquirer." the poll out this morning -- results available online. thank you for being with us. let's give back your phone calls. mike joins us from pennsylvania, democrat line. good morning. caller: good morning. my question is, with the controversy around the voter i.d. issue, the republican legislature suppressing turnout, do you think this will in any way suppress turnout and, if so, will it be enough to effect the margins in any way? thanks. host: thanks for the call. guest: last march, the legislature passed a law that requires pennsylvania voters to show up with one of six approved photo id is. if you did not have one in the meantime, the state would provide you with one. you had to go through certain procedures to get a photo id. more recently, in the last few weeks, a state judge simply set aside that particular provision of the law so that pennsylvanian is on november 6 -- you'll be asked to show one of those six forms of id. if you d
. the pentagon had declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and networks, as a new domain of war. and yet, we realized that maybe one in a thousand people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and depth of the vulnerabilities. and so what we're trying to do in the zero day series is to take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and the platoon i can idea is that -- p mr. speaker atonic idea is everybody from my mom and dad and to people in the congress, everybody can understand and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace better. >> cyberspace vulnerabilities, monday night at 8:00 p.m. eastern on "the communicators" on c-span2. >> president obama went to the headquarters of the federal emergency management agency today to get an update on preparations for hurricane sandy. the national response coordination center in washington is where fema is managing the deployment of federal resources to states along the east coast, ahead of the storm. >> thank you. >> keep it up. thank you. >> great job. >> >> across the country are conc
at just the work environment where do you look at the home environment. a lot of habits that you have a development for home, you want people to practice safe computing wherever they are. whether or not it is their device from your device, or whatever kind of device. so i think that to sympathize with the public to the challenges and in a way that we did keep america beautiful, keep america safe, i think that we really need to do that. the second point -- i have three of them. the second point is that the sky is falling ocean is just hurting us. because people say yeah, right. but i think that we need to not communicate the sky is falling in the sky is just not going to fall. a lot of people compare now to what we did and there was a certain amount of sky is falling with y2k. the sky didn't fall. nothing fell out the sky. yet we felt we spent a lot of time and resources. last one i want to make is that it is difficult to share information when we have two political fortunes to classify. it is something that i need to know or communicate. i can't communicate what you guys right now. bu
it in a responsible way for our economy, for our environment and also to make sure that people are safe on their jobs. >> we need to get away from our reliance on foreign energy. we are taking some good steps in that direction. we have some great examples right here in peoria. with the ag lab. they are researching something that has great potential. as higher oil content than soy beans. it can be planted in the off- season. and has great potential to be used as an alternative biofuel. within the 17th congressional district, we have examples of solar farms. we have examples of wind farms. and did a favor of keeping the wind farm subsidy. that is currently being fought by the republican presidential nominee. i am at a favor of that. we have a district that can be a leader in the united states for helping us come up with alternative energy sources and get away from the rely on foreign tule. i'm very excited about the possibility. very excited about how the ag lab can play a major part in that. ashink, let's use this area an example that we can hold up around the rest of the country. >> rebuttal from con
think of hope for the environment, or food, clothing, shelter? we do. weyerhaeuser, growing ideas. >> just going to keep on keeping on, until every single person out there who needs to vote is going to go vote. >> this week on "inside washington," the endgame. the last debate. >> nothing governor romney just said is true. attacking >> me is not talking about how we deal with the challenges in the middle east. >> the women's vote and the return of the abortion debate. >> i think even when life begins in that horrible situation of rape that it is something that god intended to happen. >> the colin powell endorsement. >> i was proud to learn that we have colin powell's support in this campaign. >> you have to wonder if that is based on issues or whether he has a slightly reason for preferring president obama -- a slightly different reason for preferring president obama. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> we are all most of their pit believe it or not, at the election is now less than two weeks away and both candidates are running as if there is no to
declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and networks as a new domain of the war and yet we realized that maybe one in a thousand people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and death of the vulnerabilities. and so, what we are trying to do in the series is take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and the platonic idea is that everybody from my mom and dad and congress and people around the country can understand and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace better. we have a pretty simple proposition. you can either embrace the kind of approach commerce one wilson has embraced. she signed the pledge to support the cut cabin balance program. that's a tea party approach to balancing the budget and it has no new revenues even for the wealthiest americans. and it is so draconian that would require deep cuts in social security and medicare over time or we can member is a balanced approach. that's what i support and i think we can go back to the kind of tax rates we had under the clinton administration and those upper income e
environment. when jack markell ran he put together a blueprint for delaware. we have not done a good enough job of creating that environment. >> let us go to the follow up. we stand on the blueprint for delaware? >> we still of war to go. some of them we did not have the resources. i said we ought to agree to dollar version. we have not been able to add as much as we would like. mr. gregg can say hispanic, but it is not spin. it is not spin to the people -- jeff craig can say is sprin. in. these are real jobs, real family is being put back to work. >> feel free to offer your opinion. >> it is then 30,000 unemployed from 18,000 additional who have dropped out of the workforce, people of taken part-time jobs, we can argue, but on election day those people will go to the polls and make a decision. >> of cited the high percentage of people in delaware and a part of their paychecks from the government. if you are to trim down the government are produced exasperatingly problem? >> i moved to delaware in the late 1980's. today the largest employer is the state of delaware, the second largest is th
. small businesses are taxed at 35%. that is not sustainable in this environment today. we have to change the loopholes at the top. big companies like ge and others pay no taxes and small companies pay up to 35%. we need to make it fair to everybody. first and foremost, we have to create an environment that our small businesses can thrive. when we look at the uniqueness on the border that is different and the tax reform or the nation, we need immigration reform. as i travel the border and i meet with agricultural people, we have a work force problem because the immigration system and the visa system is broken. these problems trade an impediment to congress. we have to be able to provide a work force but can move back and forth easily. we are not able to do that because of the impediments that are there by not having an effective comprehensive immigration policy. that becomes an economic issue as well. the workers here who want to work, there is not enough of them. the workers who come across the border to take care of the ranches and agricultural industry, they can i get back and forth li
to be thrown into thn chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where he was alone. >> narrator: then, when he was ten, his mother sent him to hawaii to live with his grandparents. >> i think it's natural to assume that your father be absent, then form a relationship with your stepfather, and then be separated from him and be separated from your mother and go live with your grandparents who at that point you don't really know that well... it must have been profoundly unsettling. >> his early life is a constant stream of people leaving, of him being left. his mother, his father, his grandparents constantly moving. his whole life is really a, sort of a classic search for home. >> narrator: they lived in a small two-bedroom high-rise apartment in honolulu. >> his grandfather was a heavy drinker. what surprised me as i was researching my book was actually the president himself telling me that h
it would be like at age six to be thrown into the chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where he was alone. c2 >> nrator: then, when he wasas ten, h mothesent him t to ve with his grandparents >> i think is natura assume thayour fbe absent, then fm a reship wi yr ster, and en be separat from him and ber sepad fr yr mo and go liv yougrandpar o at that point you don' ally knoat w it mushave bn profound unseng. >> h early l a cstant stream opeople lving, h beg left his moer, his ther, his grandpar cstany moving his whole life is really a, sort of a classic search for home.mo >> narrator: they lived in a small two-bedroom high-rise apartment in honolulu. >> his grandfather was a heavy drinker. what surprised me as i was researching my book was actually the president himself telling me that his grandmother was an alcoholic, too. >> narrator: but barry had gotten lucky. hawaii's most
some major advancement that would be great for the environment. obviously, the youth vote is very critical. it is also very unusual that people care so much. [inaudible] so you are lucky and blessed to be listening to and to be part of this election. >> tim? >> though, i wanted people to step up a little bit. we talked about fiscally conservative people, and i would like to see some socially liberal liberals. we didn't get into the juggler or civil liberties were a bunch of other things. and i would like to see something from the left. as far as i can see, we have gone butkus on all those issues. every couple of years, there is a big debate that are held in some false. a connection between libertarians and conservatives, is coming to an end? my friend, jonah goldberg, says it has a pretty good idea -- libertarians are useful because they ask the question should the government be doing the thing we are talking about. there are some things that libertarians can learn from conservatives. one of the roots of conservatism -- after eight years of bush in four years of obama, i'm not sur
of those volts tenny hoyer voted for. not a single one talked about women's health care, the environment, not a single one was talking about transportation infrastructure, not a single one of those votes were dealing on education or a single one on gun control, all things that i think are important to the people of the 10th district and i think are critical votes -- [inaudible conversations] schneider. if we look at the record of this congress which is the most ineffective in our lifetimes, he voted twice with the ryan plan. he talks -- he voted with this congress over 200 times against our environment, over 28 times against obamacare. he's voted with them on issue after issue, on every core issue -- >> moderator: okay. you raised an important one. congressman dold, your votes on obamacare. you voted against it. why? dold: if we look at the affordable care act, i think we can agree there are some things -- >> moderator: by the way, you call it the affordable care act as opposed to obamacare. dold: i think we got 23 new taxes on this. the estimates in terms of the cost estimates on the ne
back. personal income tax and we need to create a stable business environment. we have not done a good enough job creating that environment and that is borne out by the numbers. >> where do you stand on your blueprint for delaware? >> we have implemented the majority of items in their and we have more to go. some of them we did not have the resources. i said we ought to create a delaware version of a cops bill. we have made progress there as well. it is not spin to the hundreds of workers were back at the refinery. it is not spin to the people who decided to expand in delaware. it is not spin to the folks at foxfire printing who are adding dozens of jobs. it is not spin to the people at jpmorgan chase. these are real jobs, real families being put back to work. >> fill free to offer your opinion. >> 18,000 additional individuals who have dropped out of the work force, people who have taken part-time jobs, we can argue back and forth about the numbers but those people go to the polls and i will make a decision based on their own personal experience. >> >> you cited the number of people w
discussions about. actually, one of them was the environment and how we cover the environment. every time we tried to do a prime-time special we would not get a rating, and that led -- one of the chapters are right about this, where i don't come across well, we had leonardo dicaprio at one point, president clinton, and i get killed for it. i did not intend, but we did a prime-time environmental special , and dicaprio was the chairman of earth day that year, and we talk to my that he would make an appearance at the end -- ended up interviewing the president. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment and a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more than other people did. john miller, our correspondent went in an interview bin laden, the last western journalist the trekked into the mountains in afghanistan, and we did a prime-time special or two, but i had some dealings with the military in washington he said their biggest concern was an act of domestic terrorism. we had active discussions about doing more. in retrospect wish
case of what actually happened there, but i think in this highly partisan environment right now no one believes what anybody says right now on either side. right now if you're a republican you believe what republican sources say, if you're a democrat you believe what democratic sources say. and i think that after the election we should have a full accounting of what actually happened there and people who made mistakes should be fired or held accountable as such. but between now and tuesday is not the time to have that debate. between now and tuesday we have to focus on our national election, and again, like i said, nobody believes what anybody is saying any more. it's unfortunate but that's what our politics have come to in this country where we just don't trust each other any more. megyn: chris plant is this very well rant to the national election. >> of course it is. we need answers and deserve answers before the election. the president needs to come out and make it clear whether he was the one making the calls during the massacre in benghazi, whether he was the one that personally i
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of difficult to imagine a president with with that high of approval in this kind of environment the getting thrown out, getting rejected. host: thomas fitzgerald, who covers politics for "the philadelphia inquirer." thank you for being with us. but it back to your phone calls. mike from pennsylvania, democratic line. good morning. caller: the morning, steve and terry. with controversy about the voter id lot to suppress turnout, do you think that this will in any way suppress turnout? if so, will it be enough to affect the margins in any way? thanks. guest: last march, the legislature passed a law that required pennsylvania voters to show up with one of six approved photo id's. if you did not have one, they would provide you with one but you have to go through certain procedures to get one. more recently, in the last three weeks, a judge in our states simply set aside that particular provision of law so that when pennsylvanian is go to vote on november 6th, you will be asked to show one of those six forms of identification. if you do not have one, you will still be permitted to vote. your vo
an environment in washington, d.c., where we are working together. we are trying to create an environment of working together. it is a political year. of course she is going to endorse the senator that best represents her local view, which is connected. >> senator, your turn. >> she did not endorse me. she just said what the record was. politics should never trump jobs. the problem was not wanting to invest in this country. clean water and clean air, it is a $3 billion industry, and we can have both, but you need regulations, and 50 days before an election they announced three years ago they are going to kill the plant. >> he brought us the company from an action the epa took, and epa was told by the chamber of commerce that if you took that action if you voted not to suspend the rules, they would not have to prevent it. that is the problem. you see bureaucrats are dictating policy in montana. we can do just fine. >> the congressman has talked about 95% and other things that are patently false. they said they could deal with these rules. the problem they have is with ash and hayes. they c
these votes not a single one talked about women's healthcare or the environment, not a single one talked about the votes education or a single one on gun control. all things that i think are important to the 10th district and i think are critical votes. >> if we look at the record of this congress which is the most ineffective congress we've had in our life times. he voted twice on the ryan plan and voucher program. he voted with this congress over 200 times against our environment. over 28 times genls obamacare. he's voted with them on issue after issue. >> you raced an important one. congressman dole your votes on obama care you voted against it is why? >> the affordable care ak act, there are things positive. >> you call it the affordable care act as opposed to obamacare? >> we need to call it by its name. we have 2 new taxes on this. the estimates on the new set of 10 years doubled so this is going to be troubling. >> it didn't double. >> it did. after two years it is doubling so i think this is troubling because small businesses are looking at how can i pay the penalty and tell people the
in a highly politicized and highly charged political environment, we simply, as the white house, and as the state department has collected information, they have gotten its to the american public. host: democrat from florida. go ahead? all right, we're going to move on to barbara. angie, are you with us? you are on the air. caller: when americans wake up on november 7th, they have been made the right choice of president obama. -- corporations running their country, they will regret their choice for ever. everything the president has done -- doing it -- he inherited bankruptcy of the whole country. -- shipped off the jobs to foreign countries. i lived through that. i have been a refugee almost all of my life. guest: a couple of the important points that you bring up -- one of them is that, i do believe that voters in florida and the voters in iowa, and voters across the country understand the depth of what this president and his team faced when it came in. today is the anniversary of the great crash in 1929. the dow did not come back to its pre-1929 levels until 1954. that is wha
was hoping we could talk a little bit about changing media environment. you mentioned that we haven't had a prosecution of reporter or media organization. but i'm wondering if you're faults are any challenges posed by the landscape, the emergency of the new organizations and technologies that might be as responsible and willing to listen to government requests. are we looking at the new era because of the kind of fragmentation of the media environment and what kind of challenges might there be for the classification regime and prosecutors going forward? >> you mean is aera journalist? >> it complicates the issue let's put it that way. it's not of "the new york times" >> neil? >> they're worried about the article on the front page of the post that has was that information you were thinking about now. all of new types of journalists or media operate under the constraints of the traditional media do. i give a lot of credit to the "washington post" and the others when the of clauson for the information they think they have that information to the government and say look, you make the case for
environment. >> thank you. chris, so you start running drugs for a man named jeff andrews. can you describe for us the worst experience when you're heading up to wichita, right? >> yes, i never did drugs, so i don't understand the drug culture per se, but i'll never forget the first drug load iran was over 100 pounds. and we negotiated the price. i get in the car and start driving and all i can think was man, what happens if my car breaks down? what happens if i get a flat tire? what happens if they get in a wreck? i was out over the fact drugs or in my car. at that point, delusions and paranoia starts speaking in nbc's ghost behind every tree in cops behind every bush. i really thought i was going insane in that moment. >> she had a particularly ingenious disguise i thought. >> well, there's a ski mountain south of el paso sectors and skis in the car at the ski report. when i hit the border patrol check point, the border agent, they'd never question me before. when i was running drugs have as much younger and of course much better looking because i had hair. [laughter] so you would've neve
that he's been able to operate in the most difficult environments. as the governor just said he was the governor of probably the most democratic state in the country. but as a republican he sat done with people of different views and said let's figure out what we can agree on, what we can do. now this country has a lot of problems. we're spending money we don't have and that's got to end. we know mitt romney knows how to balance budgets. we know mitt romney knows how to fix the problems that are facing this country. [applause] so we need a leader like that in washington. i can tell you from experience the man in the white house has fallen short on his job of uniting people and pointing this country in a direction that offers us all hope. he has failed in that effort. i can also tell you we have tens of thousands of people in virginia who dedicate their life in uniform. many veterans know what i speak because we thank you and virge has hey rich heritage in playing a huge role in the defense of this country and the promotion of its national security. and thank you for that [applau
for my issues which are limited government and lower taxes and less regulatory environment. i think in colorado where you find is you move west across the united states. the republican voter is a closet-libertarian type loder where it is limited government. it is an old west at age, keep government out of our lives. you see democratic voters as evident by our governor who moved more toward the center. if they could have another moniker it would be the common sense party. limited government and less washington, d.c. involvement. >> the governor is a democrat. what is the makeup of the state legislature? guest: we have a slight majority in the statehouse so we control the state house. in the state senate you have a slim majority. our attorney general and secretary of state and state treasurer are three other statewide elected officials. the governor, democrat who is very popular is obviously a democrat. it is representative of the voting population which we are helter-skelter and we have democrats and republicans controlling all sorts of key offices. caller: i have two questions. gove
. that's good for your pocketbook. that's good for our national security, it's good for the environment. and one reason we have been able to -- we have confidence we can keep on making progress is we have doubled the fuel efficiency standards for cars and trucks so in the middle of the next decade, you'll go twice as far on a gallon of gas. i want us now to build on that progress. we've got to keep making those investments. i don't want fuel efficient cars and long lasting batteries and wind turbines and solar panels produced in china. i want them produced right here in new hampshire. i want them made right here in america, and we can do that. number three, we have to make it a national mission to educate our kids and train our workers better than anybody else in the world. i want to recruit 100,000 new math and science teachers because we know that's an area where we can't afford to fall behind. i want to train 2 million workers at our community colleges for the skills that businesses are hiring for right now. and i want to work with colleges and universities to make sure that tuition
, but we are not operating in a vacuum. we are operating in an economic environment where we have $16 billion debt in washington. families are struggling. we need money here for the american people here. i will stop giving our tax dollars to support terrorists. i support what joe manchin supports regarding responsible exploration for oil and gas. senator brown is try to block exploration of oil and gas and ohio. he does not support our coal mining families in eastern ohio. i will work to keep these energy jobs in ohio. i believe in ohio, energy equals jobs. >> most of what josh said wasn't true, about where we spend money, and energy exploration. let me answer it this way. i told you about the roundtables. a farmer told me we can save billions of dollars taking away the farm subsidies with a better safety net. i went to senator thune from south dakota. he got it amended into the farm bill and it passed in july. it can be the china currency bill. i teamed up with kay bailey hutchinson -- i can list 10 or 15 things that were good, bipartisan efforts that are making a difference. >> trea
environment it's also very difficult to see or to guarantee that various rebel groups will not turn their arms on each other. unfortunately, the situation in syria has already deteriorated to such a point that even if assad were to magically disappear tomorrow, that would not spell the end of the conflict or the problems in syria. there are significant issues now at play. significant sectarian tensions as well as ethnic tensions between kurds and arabs and so forth. the third argument is that if the u.s. arms or helps to arm these opponents, it will translate into greater u.s. influence over those who eventually run syria. again, history proves that that is not the case. so i, so let me, let me, with that, with my two minutes that i've now been told i have left, let me move and try to end on a positive note which is, essentially, my own sense is that the downside risks of a military option in syria are significant. i also think the fact that we have reached the point we have reached with the conflict which is to say such a significant escalation of horrific violence inside the country as well
in creating the overall environment, the actual act is pretty quickly attributed directly on the insurgents. >> general -- >> thank you. just a final remark by me on this issue. protecting the civilian population is an absolute principle of this operation. without that protection this operation, in my view, would not be viable. and i think that is the view of all my counterparts and afghans as well. >> [inaudible] >> general and dame mary, the north atlantic council decides the rules of engagement. does the north atlantic council direct that in those rules of engagement if there was a possibility of a civilian casualty, that engagement should not take place, or is it a judgment call given down to the respective commander at the level that it's required to be made? in other words, if there's a possibility of a is civilian being hurt -- of a civilian being hurt by, say, a drone strike, it doesn't go ahead, or is it a judgment call made at another level? >> no. >> we are not allowed to give details on rules of engagement. >> indeed, i won't. but what i can say, the political guidance always gi
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